Open Access Peer-reviewed Research Article

Main Article Content

Danielle R Stagg
John R Slate corresponding author
Frederick C Lunenburg

Abstract

In this investigation, the 1-year persistence rates of Hispanic students in Texas community colleges were analyzed for the 2007-2008 through the 2013-2014 academic years.  Of particular interest was whether the 1-year persistence rates of Hispanic students different by their institutional status (i.e., stayed at the same community college or transferred to a different community college).  Inferential statistical analyses revealed the presence of statistically significant differences in the 1-year persistence rates of Hispanic students in Texas community colleges by institutional status in the 2007-2008, 20082009, 2009-2010, 2011-2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 academic years.  The 1-year persistence rates were higher for Hispanic Texas community college students when they stayed at the same community college rather than when they transferred to a different community college.  The 1-year persistence rates of Hispanic students who stayed at the same Texas community college ranged from a low of 54% to a high of 60%.  In comparison, the 1-year persistence rates of Hispanic students who transferred to a different Texas community college ranged from a low of 42% to a high of 51%.  

Keywords
Hispanic students, 1-year persistence rates, Texas, community colleges, transferred, stayed

Article Details

How to Cite
Stagg, D., Slate, J., & Lunenburg, F. (2020). Differences in 1-year persistence rates by the institutional status of Hispanic community college students: A Texas, multiyear analysis. Advances in Educational Research and Evaluation, 1(1), 24-32. https://doi.org/10.25082/AERE.2020.01.004

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